Kings Arms Coffee Co.

El Salvador Finca El Naranjo

$18.00
  • El Salvador Finca El Naranjo

Kings Arms Coffee Co.

El Salvador Finca El Naranjo

$18.00
Processing: Honey Process
Flavor Notes: dried cherry, pomegranate, cranberry
Region: Apaneca, Ahuachapán, Apaneca – Ilamatepec
Elevation: 1200 to 1350 Meters


Finca El Naranjo is just outside the town of Apaneca, Ahuachapan and lies on the sloping mountainside of Cerro Ahuachapan. The altitude at the farm ranges from 1200 to 1350 meters above sea level and this lot is a blend of the different cultivars they are growing which include, Bourbon, Caturra, Pacas, Sanpacho and Marsallesa. The coffee is harvested and then transported to be milled nearby at Beneficio San Miguel, where the cherry is first graded by ripeness (the coffee has to be 95% ripe cherry before it is depulped - everything else is reserved for lower grades). Beneficio San Miguel's honey processing technics are a little more involved than what we typically see. After depulping the coffee, leaving some of the fruit intact, they bag up the wet, sticky parchment into jute and let it sit overnight in order to start a sort of dry fermentation. Then the coffee is laid out on raised African drying beds for about a week before being finished on patios.  

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  • Description
Processing: Honey Process
Flavor Notes: dried cherry, pomegranate, cranberry
Region: Apaneca, Ahuachapán, Apaneca – Ilamatepec
Elevation: 1200 to 1350 Meters


Finca El Naranjo is just outside the town of Apaneca, Ahuachapan and lies on the sloping mountainside of Cerro Ahuachapan. The altitude at the farm ranges from 1200 to 1350 meters above sea level and this lot is a blend of the different cultivars they are growing which include, Bourbon, Caturra, Pacas, Sanpacho and Marsallesa. The coffee is harvested and then transported to be milled nearby at Beneficio San Miguel, where the cherry is first graded by ripeness (the coffee has to be 95% ripe cherry before it is depulped - everything else is reserved for lower grades). Beneficio San Miguel's honey processing technics are a little more involved than what we typically see. After depulping the coffee, leaving some of the fruit intact, they bag up the wet, sticky parchment into jute and let it sit overnight in order to start a sort of dry fermentation. Then the coffee is laid out on raised African drying beds for about a week before being finished on patios.